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Latest from NHI...

Applications (series) (6)

Tuesday, 01 March 2016 16:15

Safety Concerns

Have you ever had a close call and realized the warning label was staring you right in the face? Or perhaps you’ve had that old trusty snow blower or lawn mower since 1900 and the labels are all worn off? Maybe it’d be a good idea to dig out that manual and review those safety concerns.

 

 In this installment we’re going to take a few minutes to show you some of the most common safety concerns for the most common pulley applications; lawn mowers and snow blowers. For the most up to date information on your specific machine please refer to the manual that came with it. If you don’t have the manual please contact the manufacturer of your machine for a copy.

 

 

 

Lawn Mowers

According to http://www.cpsc.gov//Global/Safety Education and http://www.cpsc.gov//...Riding Lawnmower, “from 2012 through 2014, an average of 36,000 people were treated in hospital emergency rooms from walk behind power mower injuries” and 35,000 annually for injuries related to riding mowers. Common patterns for fatal incidents include; the machine tips over, the victim falls under or is run over by the machine, or the victim is thrown/falls off the machine.

Safety suggestions include:

Wear proper clothing including closed toe shoes with proper grip and eye & ear protection, never wear loose clothing that could get caught in moving parts

Fill the fuel tank before starting the engine, never refuel the mower when it is running or while the engine is hot

Never start or run a gas-powered machine in an enclosed area like a garage or shed as carbon-monoxide poisoning can occur

Always be aware of the cord on electric corded mowers, do not run the cord over with the mower

Remove debris from the lawn before mowing so it is not struck by the mower and thrown out from the mower at high speed

Never clear a clog or jam with your hands, use a long stick or the cleaning device provided on some newer machines

Never put hands or feet near rotating parts and keep clear of discharge chutes/openings

Children should not be allowed near a lawn mower when it’s in use

Never carry passengers

Never leave a running machine unattended

Mowing on a slope:

Riding mowers should mow up and down slopes, Not across

Walk-behind mowers should mow across slopes, Not up and down

Do not mow on wet grass as you may lose footing or traction and/or clog discharge chutes

 

Snow Blowers

According to http://www.consumerreports.org/...safer-snow-blowing “finger injuries, including amputations, accounted for about half of the more than 3,300 estimated emergency room visits related to snow blowers reported in 2012. Back and shoulder strain were also common”. https://www.amfam.com/...snow-blower-safety states that more than 5,500 people are treated in emergency rooms for snow blower injuries annually. “The most common cause of injury is when someone tries to clear a clogged discharge chute with their hands while the engine is running.”

Safety suggestions include:

Wear proper clothing including closed toe shoes with proper grip and eye & ear protection, never wear loose clothing that could get caught in moving parts

Fill the fuel tank before starting the engine, never refuel the blower when it is running or while the engine is hot

Never start or run a gas-powered machine in an enclosed area like a garage or shed as carbon-monoxide poisoning can occur

Always be aware of the cord on electric corded blowers, do not run the cord over with the blower

Remove debris from the area before blowing so it is not struck by the blower and thrown out from the blower at high speed

Never clear a clog or jam with your hands, use a long stick or the cleaning device provided on some newer machines

Never put hands or feet near rotating parts and keep clear of discharge chutes/openings

- Children should not be allowed near a snow blower when it’s in use

- Never leave a running machine unattended

 

Additional Sources

Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC)

http://www.cpsc.gov/

 

Outdoor Power Equipment Institute (OPEI) – Safety Tips While Mowing

http://opei.org/content/uploads/2015/03/Fact-Sheet-Lawn-Mower-Safety-2-gac.pdf

 

University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture – Lawn Mower Safety

http://www.uaex.edu/publications/pdf/fsa-1005.pdf

 

Mississippi State University – Lawn Mower Safety

http://msucares.com/pubs/publications/p1097.pdf

 

Lawn Mower Safety Videos

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UCVbnTl-b6M

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CaooqW0GJkc

 

Snow Thrower Safety Alert

http://www.cpsc.gov//Global/Safety%20Education/Home%20Garden%20Outdoors/5117_Snowthower_Safety_Alert.pdf

 

Snow Blower Safety Videos

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fqp1WIXT8kQ

 

Recalls – Consumer Products

https://www.recalls.gov/cpsc.html

 

In the next installment we’ll continue our discussion with some key maintenance tips for snow blowers and lawn mowers including the ‘Look Before You Pump’ initiative.

 

If you have any questions or just want to chat please don’t hesitate to send an email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or leave a comment here.

 

New Hampshire Industries (NHI)

68 Etna Rd, Lebanon, NH 03766

Tuesday, 23 February 2016 16:15

Seasonal Equipment

In this installment we’re going to take a moment and show you the types of pulleys you might find on many everyday seasonal products you use. Many pulleys are unseen unless you get the chance to look under exterior housing or into the motor or engine compartment.

 

 

So how many products did you see that you never thought had a pulley? In the next installment we’ll discuss some general safety concerns on common products and ways to prevent injury during use. Have you ever had a close call and realized the warning label was staring you right in the face? Or perhaps you’ve had that old trusty snow blower or lawnmower since 1900 and the labels are all worn off? Maybe it’d be a good idea to dig out that manual and review those safety concerns.

 

If you have any questions or just want to chat please don’t hesitate to send an email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or leave a comment here.

 

New Hampshire Industries (NHI)

68 Etna Rd, Lebanon, NH 03766

Friday, 12 February 2016 16:15

Overview

Below is a visual preview of the series to come. You may not realize just how many pulleys you have in your own home or town!

 

 

Part One - End Unit Products

 

Part Two - End Unit Products (Seasonal Equipment)

 

Part Three - Safety Concerns

 

Part Four - Tips/Maintenance

 

 

In part five we’ll show our employees’ favorites and top picks from across the country. You may be surprised all the places pulleys are used!

 

If you have any questions or just want to chat please don’t hesitate to send an email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or leave a comment here.

 

New Hampshire Industries (NHI)

68 Etna Rd, Lebanon, NH 03766

Monday, 07 March 2016 16:15

Maintenance Tips

In this installment we’re going to take you through some maintenance tips for the most common pulley applications; lawn mowers and snow blowers. With a few simple tasks your machine can purr for years to come. For the most up to date information on your specific machine please refer to the manual that came with it. If you don’t have the manual please contact the manufacturer of your machine for a copy.

 

 

 

 

Lawn Mowers

How to Maintain a Lawn Mower - This Old House

Simple Lawn Mower Tune-Up and Maintenance

Push Mower Maintenance – Lowe’s Home Improvement

How Does A Lawn Mower Work? — Repair & Troubleshooting Tips

NOTE: Before any maintenance, disengage the spark plug so the mower will not start.

 

Beginning of Season (Spring) Tips:

-          Change oil

-          Check air filter for dirt/debris, change as necessary

-          Change spark plug

-          Lubricate wheels and all moving cables

-          Check tire pressure

-          Check all nuts and bolts and tighten as necessary

-          Check blade for sharpness, sharpen/replace as necessary

-          Clean the undercarriage of the mower deck of debris and buildup

-          Gas should be stored in a proper container and out of direct sunlight

End of Season (Fall) Tips:

-          Run mower out of gas (for the health of the engine and carburetor)

-          Clean the undercarriage of the mower deck of debris and buildup

-          Spray lubricant on any bare metal structural parts to prevent rusting

 

 

 

Snow Blowers

How to Maintain Your Snow Blower - This Old House

How Does a Snowblower Work? — Repair & Troubleshooting Tips

NOTE: Before any maintenance, disengage the spark plug so the blower will not start.

 

Beginning of Season (Fall) Tips:

-          Change oil

-          Check spark plug, change as necessary

-          Check belts, change as necessary

-          Lubricate wheels and all moving parts

-          Check all nuts and bolts and tighten as necessary

-          Have spare shear pins on hand

-          Gas should be stored in a proper container and out of direct sunlight

End of Season (Spring) Tips:

-          Run blower out of gas (for the health of the engine and carburetor)

-          Clean the auger housing and impeller of debris and buildup

-          Spray lubricant on any bare metal structural parts to prevent rusting

 

 

Look Before you Pump

Ethanol Education for Equipment Users

Ethanol Education - Look Before You Pump!

Almost all unleaded fuel found at your average gas station today contains at least 10% ethanol (e.g. E10, E15, E85). Current outdoor power equipment is designed to handle up to 10% ethanol (E10) though the less ethanol in your gas the better. Special fuel containing no ethanol can also be purchased for your outdoor power equipment. There is much debate over ethanol’s corrosive properties and the effect it can have on engines and system parts not designed to handle it. As technologies update and adapt to be compatible with higher percentage ethanol fuels it will become safer and common place to use such fuels. As it stands currently though, current fuel systems are designed to run best and last the longest with E10 or less.

 

Additional Sources

Maintenance Tips for your Lawn Mower

http://www.repairclinic.com/Lawn-Mower-Maintenance-Tips

http://www.repairclinic.com/Snowblower-Maintenance-Tips

https://www.nmma.org/assets/cabinets/Cabinet528/CONSUMER-FACT-SHEET_BOAT.pdf

 

In the next installment we’ll show our employees’ favorite pulley applications and top picks from across the country.

 

If you have any questions or just want to chat please don’t hesitate to send an email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or leave a comment here.

 

New Hampshire Industries (NHI)

68 Etna Rd, Lebanon, NH 03766

Thursday, 18 February 2016 16:15

End Unit Products

In this installment we’re going to take a moment and show you the types of pulleys you might find on many everyday products you use. Many pulleys are unseen unless you get the chance to look under exterior housing or into the motor or engine compartment.

 

 

 

 

 

So how many products did you see that you never thought had a pulley? Don’t worry there are more! In the next installment we’ll focus on seasonal equipment like tractors, lawn mowers, jet skis, snowmobiles and snow blowers. It really is quite amazing the extent with which pulleys are used.

 

If you have any questions or just want to chat please don’t hesitate to send an email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or leave a comment here.

 

New Hampshire Industries (NHI)

 

68 Etna Rd, Lebanon, NH 03766

Monday, 21 March 2016 15:15

Employee Picks

In our final installment we have some fun photos from our own employees and their favorite pulley applications. As we’ve seen in past installments, there is quite the range of grownup “toys” that use pulleys. We all have our own personal favorites, what’s yours?

 

Ruth - Accounting (with NHI since early 2015)

Pictured with her father in the early 70’s, he’s showing her his John Deere bulldozer. Ruth says that her father had several of the same kind over the next 30 years.

 

Ross - Engineering (with NHI since mid 2015)

Pictured with his brand new John Deere D140 lawn tractor. Ross says this is the first ride-on he’s ever owned.

 

Crystal - Planning (with NHI since early 2013)

Pictured with her parents’ Toro 50” TimeCutter zero-turn lawn mower. They’re ready for spring and another mowing season.

 

Terri – Production (with NHI since early 2013)

Pictured with a John Deere 5065E tractor. Terri is “window shopping” at her local tractor dealership.

 

Erik – Marketing (with NHI since late 2010)

Pictured with his Ariens Compact22 snowblower. He’s enjoying this past winter’s unseasonal warmth. Perhaps he’s enjoying the warmth a bit too much…

 

It’s quite remarkable all the places pulleys are found!

 

If you have any questions or just want to chat please don’t hesitate to send an email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or leave a comment here.

 

New Hampshire Industries (NHI)

 

68 Etna Rd, Lebanon, NH 03766

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